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CANADIAN NEWS

Norwegian author causes a storm with 'fat' comment

Twitter users are up in arms after Karl Ove Knausgaard says he'd 'never seen people that fat' after a trip to Newfoundland.

  • Quebec man charged for not giving up phone password at border

    A law professor in Halifax says the case of a Quebec man charged with obstructing border officials raises a new legal question in Canada. The accused, 38-year-old Alain Philippon of St. Anne-des-Plaines, Quebec, refused to divulge his smart phone password to Canada Border Services Agency during a customs search. Rob Currie is the director of the Law and Technology Institute at the Schulich School of Law.

    CBC
  • 'Seinfeld' Actor Daniel von Bargen Dies at 64

    Daniel von Bargen, the talented character actor perhaps best known for playing George Costanza’s imbecilic boss Mr. Kruger during the last season of Seinfeld, has died. Von Bargen, who also stood out as Commandant Edwin Spangler on the Fox sitcom Malcolm in the Middle, died Sunday after a long illness, his friend, actor Bob Colonna, said. In February 2012, von Bargen was seriously injured when he shot himself in the temple in an apparent suicide attempt, distraught because he had been battling diabetes and was set to have two toes removed.

    The Hollywood Reporter
  • Dr. Saira Malik's former patients not surprised by reprimand

    In addition to the reprimand, Dr. Saira Malik will have to take a record keeping course, complete a program to address her "disrespectful style and generally unprofessional behaviour," and take part in an audit that will review deficiencies.

    CBC
  • Trial delayed for woman accused of committing indecent act on aircraft

    The trial of a 25-year-old woman accused of committing an indecent act on a Toronto-to-Halifax flight has been delayed because her lawyer is ill. Alicia Elizabeth Lander has pleaded not guilty to committing an indecent act, assaulting a police officer, committing an act of mischief and causing a disturbance at Halifax Stanfield International Airport on Jan. 24, 2014. Jason George Chase had pleaded not guilty to committing an indecent act, but he later changed his plea to guilty and waived his right to a trial.

    The Canadian Press
  • The apps Edward Snowden recommends to protect your privacy online

    There are a host of free, easy-to-use apps and programs that can help protect your privacy online, and if everybody uses them it can provide a sort of "herd immunity" said Edward Snowden in a live video chat from Russia on Wednesday. Snowden appeared via teleconference in an event hosted by Ryerson University and Canadian Journalists For Expression, to launch the CJFE's online database that complies all of the publicly released classified documents the former U.S. National Security Agency contractor leaked. In response to a Twitter question,Snowden expanded on what tools he recommends for privacy. "You need to ensure your communications are protected in transit," said Snowden.

    CBC
  • These are the big shots who live at 15 Central Park West, the world's most powerful address

    Goldman Sachs has a major presence in the building, as do some huge hedge funds. As is increasingly common in New York City's luxury towers, many of the owners at 15 Central Park West have shielded their identities by using LLCs and trusts to buy their apartments. The paperback version of "House of Outrageous Fortune" will be released on March 10.

    Business Insider
  • Noel Gallagher Is Pretty Sure No One Besides Taylor Swift's Parents Thinks She's Talented

    Oasis alum and notoriously opinionated Brit Noel Gallagher dissed Taylor Swift in a recent interview with Rolling Stone, saying he doesn't think anyone besides her parents thinks she's talented

    Us Weekly
  • 10 things McDonald’s won’t tell you

    Ah, McDonald’s, the place where we feast upon Big Macs, Egg McMuffins and even the occasional sweet chili chicken McWrap. In the U.S., the fast-food chain, founded in 1948, boasts by far the largest annual restaurant sales--almost triple the volume of Subway, its nearest competitor, according to QSR magazine, a trade publication for the industry.

    MarketWatch q
  • (VIDEO) Saskatchewan skip Steve Laycock pulls off what looks like the shot of the Brier. Then, Brad Gushue one ups him

    Saskatchewan's Steve Laycock might just have earned himself 'shot of the week,' at the 2015 Brier. In the seventh end of Wednesday afternoon's game versus Brad Jacobs and Northern Ontario, Laycock's team was in trouble. Laycock's was a very, very difficult proposition, with a razor thin margin for error.

    Eh Game
  • Muslim Canadians worry about effects of anti-terror talk

    Mawla and fellow young Muslims know Canadians’ safety in the era of ISIS is about to become a ballot-box issue and they're nervous, not necessarily about terrorism, but about hate and suspicion. "I would ask him to to take it easy with the words ‘Islam’ and ‘terrorism’ and scaring people that there are jihadis or terrorists among us,” says Assma Galuta, a university student who conceived the "Give me a hug" project and hopes one day to do humanitarian work abroad. The changes she has witnessed in Canada have been swift and at times cruel.

    CBC
  • Shania Twain Announces "Rock This Country" Farewell Tour: Details

    Shania Twain is going on tour for the first time in ten years, and it will be her last -- get all of the details on her "Rock This Country" farewell tour!

    Us Weekly
  • Cyclist Christopher Beaulieu killed while training south of Edmonton

    A cyclist training for an upcoming bicycle tour was killed Monday, Feb. 23 when he was struck on a rural road near Leduc. Christopher Beaulieu, 21, was riding on Range Road 252 near Highway 19 at around 6:30 p.m. when he was hit from behind by a small pickup truck. Beaulieu was an experienced cyclist who always rode with bike lights, Michael Kalmanovitch with the Edmonton Bicycle Commuters Society said in a news release.

    CBC
  • Mike Ribeiro and wife being sued by former nanny: Report

    Mike Ribeiro has gone to great lengths this year to change his image. He asked Nashville to sign him. Bought a home in the city in order to escape the fishbowl atmosphere of other markets. Has openly discussed his past as a therapeutic measure. But sometimes the past catches up in some way shape or form.

    Puck Daddy
  • Teacher Erin Osmond takes stand at her own sexual exploitation trial

    A 29-year-old teacher from Prud'homme, Sask. is on trial, charged with the sexual exploitation of a high school student in Watrous in 2013. Osmond began a romantic relationship with the student that lasted for several months. Eventually, Osmond and the student, who can't be named because of a publication ban, became more and more romantic. Osmond's contract as a substitute teacher at the school was ending February 15.

    CBC
  • Royal coat of arms found in walls

    A Tudor royal coat of arms has been discovered embedded in the walls of a cottage in an Oxfordshire village. Pieces of the 16th Century 2m x 2m (6ft x 6ft) stone armorial were found in Tudor Cottage, in Hanwell near Banbury, during refurbishments. Owner David Crabtree said a large fleur-de-lys "fell into a pile of rubble" as builders took a wall down. Further carved stones, including three lions, were then found in other walls within the cottage.

    BBC News q
  • Why has the Nobel Peace Prize chairman been demoted?

    For the first time in its more than 100-year history, the committee that awards the Nobel Peace Prize has demoted its chairman. Barack Obama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2009, less than a year into his presidency. The European Union was recognised three years later, when the eurozone crisis threatened to rip it apart. China was outraged at the decision.

    BBC News q
  • Deer rescued from deep snow in Pointe-Verte

    A group of people in Pointe-Verte, N.B., risked danger on Wednesday to rescue a deer that got stuck in deep snow on the beach. The villagers say they didn't hesitate, but wish the Department of Natural Resources had taken action to avoid the deer getting trapped. During the daytime, the deer are often afraid to cross the road back into the forest and sometimes travel along the dangerous coastline instead.

    CBC
  • Mexican police, troops capture Zetas cartel leader, others in wealthy suburb of Monterrey

    Mexican police and soldiers on Wednesday captured Omar Trevino Morales, widely considered to be the most important leader of the Zetas drug cartel that once carved a path of brutal bloodshed along the country's northern border with the U.S. National Security Commissioner Monte Alejandro Rubido said at a news conference in Mexico City that the man known as "Z-42" was arrested in a pre-dawn raid in San Pedro Garza Garcia, a wealthy suburb of the northern city of Monterrey. A simultaneous raid on another street in the same suburb reaped Carlos Arturo Jimenez Encinas, allegedly Trevino's finance chief, Rubido said.

    The Canadian Press
  • McGill University gym women-only hours proposal causes uproar

    A proposal by two McGill law faculty students to have women-only hours at the downtown campus gym is causing an uproar at the Montreal university. When student Soumia Allalou, 23, decided to get back into shape, she contacted the university's gym and asked when women-only hours were.

    CBC
  • After waiting years, disabled Canadians now getting their CPP disability cheques

    The cheques appear to be pouring in for disabled people who have spent years trying to get Canada Pension Plan disability benefits as the Conservative government's so-called spike unit even settles some "questionable" cases. Although it was designed to streamline the appeals process and cut costs by replacing four separate boards, the backlog of CPP disability cases ballooned during the tribunal's first two years of operation. Allison Schmidt, a Regina-based pension-disability case manager who's been a vocal critic of the tribunal, says she's delighted that so many of her clients are suddenly getting their benefits.

    The Canadian Press