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EPIC FAILS

VIDEO: This guy really doesn't want his SUV towed

'I've never seen anything like this in my life,' the woman filming this says, as this man tries to release his vehicle from a tow truck... and fails.

  • Australian Spear Fisherman Discovers Bizarre Sea Battle Between Fish And Snake

    Rick Trippe is no stranger to finding strange things on his sea adventures off the coast of Darwin, but even by his standards this was a whopper. It is believed the animals he captured on camera were the elegant sea snake and a stonefish. The pair were locked in a death match when Trippe found them, while he was diving on a World War II wreck in Darwin Harbour.

    Yahoo News
  • Homeowner Shot, Dog Killed After Police Respond To The Wrong House

    A man was shot by police when they responded to the wrong house in an incident that also saw the homeowner’s pet dog killed. Police in Dekalb County, Georgia, USA, received a call about a suspicious person and rushed to what they thought was the house in question. One of the police officers was also shot in the thigh and is said to be in a critical condition, while the homeowner’s condition is not known.

    Yahoo News
  • Meet Xenia Deli: Bieber's Babe

    If you've seen Justin Bieber's "What Do You Mean?" music video, you've seen the gorgeous face of Xenia Deli. The 25-year-old model from Moldova sat down with Access Hollywood and dished about her "amazing" experience filming with The Biebs. "When I came to that audition I actually didn't know for who we were shooting," Xenia told Access, adding that landing the job was "amazing.

    Access Hollywood
  • ‘Bizarre’ Six Foot Sea Scorpion Stuns Scientists

    The excellent preservation has let researchers in on a lot of the sea scorpion’s secrets - its back legs were covered in dense setae, or bristles, which may have helped it to swim or had a sensory function.

    Yahoo News
  • What you need to know about Ontario's new road rules

    Ontario drivers will face some changes on the road starting Sept. 1, including stiffer penalties for distracted driving and new rules to protect cyclists and tow truck drivers. "Since 2009, more than 500 people have died in collisions in OPP-controlled roads, in which driver inattention was a causal factor," said OPP Sgt. Dave Rektor.

    CBC
  • Minecraft billionaire complains about being rich

    Markus Persson bemoaned the loneliness, isolation and lack of motivation that large wealth can create.

    CNBC
  • For the first time since the Australian Open, Eugenie Bouchard is Grand Slam victorious

    The Canadian defeated American Alison Riske 6-4, 6-3 to advance to the second round of the US Open Monday.

    Eh Game
  • Man knocked unconscious by punch in road rage incident

    A man from Gatineau, Que., was knocked unconscious and suffered a "serious head injury" during a road rage incident on Sunday, police say. The driver who punched the man fled the scene but police said Monday that they were able to identify him and planned to meet with him.

    CBC
  • Remembering Princess Diana (24 photos)

    A rebel princess with an empathetic heart, a mix of stubbornness and compassion – Late princess Diana had many facets to her personality. She was the most photographed woman in the 20th century.  Until a tragic car crash took her life in Paris on August 31,1997, English tabloids devoured on her life which provided endless fodder for them ever since her marriage to Prince Charles. Diana’s life story has been told and re-told a hundred times. But all those tell-alls couldn’t satiate the curiosity of the world in the 80s and 90s, the pre-social media era. The shy, young princess who got introduced to the world with her fairytale marriage with Prince Charles in 1981, soon became an instant darling of the press. Her iconic coiffure was copied by millions around the world as her life unfurled before them through photographs. The perfect picture soon began to fall apart when the world came to know about Charles’ long-term extramarital affair with Camilla Parker Bowles, whom he later married. The murky details of Diana’s broken marriage were revealed in Andrew Morton’s book – Diana, Her True Story. The book showed Diana’s life was a far cry from any fairytale;  suicide attempts, postpartum depression and eating disorders… she was just like any other vulnerable person trapped in a loveless marriage. Soon, the reports regarding her alleged affairs started making headlines, much to the embarrassment of the royal family. Following her divorce, Diana continued utilising her fame for charity works and awareness programmes. The famous ‘Ottawa Treaty’ – a bill banning the usage of anti-personnel landmines, for which she actively campaigned, came to effect after her death, and she was duly credited for her efforts in making that happen.   Diana was only 36 when that fatal car crash took her life in the wee hours in Paris 18 years back. A few days back, some photographs showed her resting place in Althorp being covered in moss, and surrounded by overgrown vegetation. But the memories of people’s princess still remain fresh in the hearts of millions even today. A pictorial tribute to the Late princess (Image credit: AP)

    Table Talk
  • Mike Corey abandons 30-day solitary wilderness trek after 7 days

    A New Brunswick man who planned to spend a month living alone in the wilderness has abandoned his adventure after seven days. Corey, an intrepid woodsman who has spent much of the past decade travelling the planet as a video-blogger for high-profile clients including Microsoft, Skype and the German National Tourism Board, had planned the excursion to mark his 30th birthday.

    CBC
  • Board recommends parole for Charles Manson follower Bruce Davis after governor blocked release

    After 43 years in prison and 30 parole hearings, parole officials on Thursday again decided it is safe to free Charles Manson follower Bruce Davis. The previous three such recommendations by the Board of Parole Hearings were blocked, once by former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and twice by Gov. Jerry Brown. "I am pleased that the board again followed the law and did the right thing, and I am hopeful that the governor will do likewise," Davis' attorney, Michael Beckman, said by telephone after the hearing.

    The Canadian Press
  • London, Ont., was world's 'serial killer capital': UWO prof

    Only 192 kilometres southwest of Toronto, the city became the "serial killer capital of the world" from 1959 to 1984, according to Michael Arntfield, a criminology professor at the University of Western Ontario. In his new book, Murder City: The Untold Story of Canada's Serial Killer Capital, Arntfield reveals the dark history of the Forest City. Arntfield, who also served as a London police officer for 15 years, analyzed 32 homicides, all the victims being women and children, over a 15-year period.  Some of those cases were solved, but most of the remaining homicides were likely the work of serial killers, the author contends.

    CBC
  • Documenting Canada's abandoned Target stores

    There are 133 vacated Target stores across Canada. One blog is collecting pictures of all of them.

    Daily Brew
  • No lemonade for you! Cops shut down Seinfeld’s family lemonade stand

    In a scenario fit for an episode of his classic sitcom, local police in East Hampton shut down a lemonade stand operated by Jerry Seinfeld, as peddling of any form in the area is strictly deemed illegal. The lemonade stand was set up last week for Seinfeld’s son Julian and his pals to not only have some harmless summer fun, but to raise money for Seinfeld’s wife Jessica’s charity Baby Buggy, the Huffington Post reports. Apparently, a neighbour wasn’t to happy with cars being illegally parked near the stand’s location and a complaint with the East Hampton Village Police was quickly phoned in.

    Daily Buzz
  • Canada-U.S. border wall idea ridiculed on social media

    Scott Walker, the governor of Wisconsin and a Republican contender for the president's job, has been ridiculed online since raising the idea of building a mammoth security wall along the Canada-U.S. border. It's rare to see the Canadian border being discussed during a presidential campaign, as candidates more often talk about the southern border. Walker's fellow presidential candidate, Donald Trump, has called for a "real wall" to be put up between the U.S. and Mexico. Fellow Republican presidential hopeful Rand Paul took a jab at Walker too.

    CBC
  • Wild Snakes Battle at University

    Hemant was at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore when he spotted an unusual sight. Two snakes had entangled themselves together in an epic battle that prompted passersby to stop and record. Luckily some people showed up to remove the possibly dangerous snakes from the college campus. Credit: YouTube/Hemant Kumar

    Storyful
  • How 1 Newborn Totally Sabotaged His Dad During a Photo Shoot

    Asher Resnik was just a week old when he decided it was the perfect time to become a viral sensation — by pooping on his dad's back during a newborn shoot. The photographer, Gigi O'Dea, told us, "This image was particularly important to [the parents] as they really wanted a special image where they could showcase baby Asher with the dad's wing tattoo on his back. Asher's dad, Mark, posted the photo to Facebook, "During his photo shoot at seven days old, my son puked on me, peed on me and pooped on me twice. "Asher was probably the happiest baby that I have ever photographed.

    PopSugar q
  • Stephen Harper calls border alcohol limits 'ridiculous'

    New Brunswick's restrictions on citizens bringing alcohol into the province from elsewhere in Canada are "ridiculous," Conservative Leader Stephen Harper said on the campaign trail Monday. Harper was in Ottawa responding to a question about whether Canadians should face legal sanctions for bringing alcohol across provincial borders. Last week in Campbellton, retiree Gerard Comeau stood trial in provincial court on a charge of violating the New Brunswick Liquor Control Act.

    CBC
  • Wrongfully convicted B.C. man seeks damages after 27 years behind bars

    The wrongful conviction of a British Columbia man who spent nearly three decades behind bars hinged on a flawed police investigation and Crown prosecutors who were willing to go to extremes to prove they'd found their man, a court has heard. Ivan Henry's lawyer John Laxton was in B.C. Supreme Court on Monday to argue that his client deserves compensation after he was mistakenly convicted in 1983 of 10 counts of sexual assault and spent 27 years in prison. "It has been suggested that Henry simply fell through the cracks of an imperfect system.

    The Canadian Press
  • About 36% of First Nations to lose funding for failing to report finances

    More than a third of First Nation communities across the country will have some of their federal funding withheld, starting today, because they haven't publicly posted their financial information online. This year, 210 First Nations, or roughly 36 per cent, have not posted their financial information online, a significantly higher number than last year when 98 per cent of bands complied with the new law.

    CBC