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EPIC FAILS

VIDEO: This guy really doesn't want his SUV towed

'I've never seen anything like this in my life,' the woman filming this says, as this man tries to release his vehicle from a tow truck... and fails.

  • Minecraft billionaire complains about being rich

    Markus Persson bemoaned the loneliness, isolation and lack of motivation that large wealth can create.

    CNBC
  • Meet Xenia Deli: Bieber's Babe

    If you've seen Justin Bieber's "What Do You Mean?" music video, you've seen the gorgeous face of Xenia Deli. The 25-year-old model from Moldova sat down with Access Hollywood and dished about her "amazing" experience filming with The Biebs. "When I came to that audition I actually didn't know for who we were shooting," Xenia told Access, adding that landing the job was "amazing.

    Access Hollywood
  • How 1 Newborn Totally Sabotaged His Dad During a Photo Shoot

    Asher Resnik was just a week old when he decided it was the perfect time to become a viral sensation — by pooping on his dad's back during a newborn shoot. The photographer, Gigi O'Dea, told us, "This image was particularly important to [the parents] as they really wanted a special image where they could showcase baby Asher with the dad's wing tattoo on his back. Asher's dad, Mark, posted the photo to Facebook, "During his photo shoot at seven days old, my son puked on me, peed on me and pooped on me twice. "Asher was probably the happiest baby that I have ever photographed.

    PopSugar q
  • No lemonade for you! Cops shut down Seinfeld’s family lemonade stand

    In a scenario fit for an episode of his classic sitcom, local police in East Hampton shut down a lemonade stand operated by Jerry Seinfeld, as peddling of any form in the area is strictly deemed illegal. The lemonade stand was set up last week for Seinfeld’s son Julian and his pals to not only have some harmless summer fun, but to raise money for Seinfeld’s wife Jessica’s charity Baby Buggy, the Huffington Post reports. Apparently, a neighbour wasn’t to happy with cars being illegally parked near the stand’s location and a complaint with the East Hampton Village Police was quickly phoned in.

    Daily Buzz
  • Pride bus: Christian driver says Calgary Transit 'threatening' him

    A Calgary bus driver is accusing the city's transit service of trying to silence him with false accusations about his conduct, after he spoke out against the pride bus. "I totally feel absolutely threatened, but I'm sick of dodging and ducking this issue," said Jesse Rau, as he stood with his wife and pastor in front of Calgary City Hall on Monday. Last week, Rau said he would quit his job if forced to drive the rainbow-coloured transit bus, because his Christian beliefs don't support homosexuality.

    CBC
  • #1 Reason Not To Buy A New Computer

    Find out the real reason behind slow computers!

  • Pregnant Manitoba child not reported to welfare agency

    The director of a Winnipeg-based child welfare agency says it did not get involved in the protection of a girl who was repeatedly raped by her stepfather, and was sent home twice to recover from abortions, because it wasn't notified of the case. "It should have been an automatic referral, so I am shocked that we did not receive this one," said Sandie Stoker, executive director of the Child and Family All Nations Emergency Coordinated Response Network (ANCR). ANCR said Friday after the sentencing hearing for the stepfather that the case only came to its attention after he was later arrested for an unrelated attack on the girl's best friend and her mother.

    CBC
  • The Most Expensive-Looking Ikea Hack We've Ever Seen (4 photos)

    Custom built-ins are one of those design elements that can step your home up from nice to magazine worthy. Unfortunately, their high style is usually matched by their price. Given this reality, you can imagine our excitement when we stumbled upon this custom built-ins hack from The Makerista. With tasteful crown molding and a sliding library ladder, this sleek built-in has all the tell-tale signs of a big-budget project, except for the steep price tag; it's made up of three Ikea Billy bookcases ranging from $40 to $60 a piece, some add-on trim, and the handiwork of a carpenter! How mind-blowingly resourceful is that? Check out a few of the awe-inspiring pictures from the project here, and head to The Makerista for the full tutorial. Want even more inspiration? Check out our favorite Ikea hacks here.

    PopSugar Home
  • Documenting Canada's abandoned Target stores

    There are 133 vacated Target stores across Canada. One blog is collecting pictures of all of them.

    Daily Brew
  • New Ontario child care rules come into effect today

    Heidi Higgins thinks of the children she looks after every day as her "extended family" but to comply with revamped rules for Ontario child care she had to tell one little boy's parents to find a different caregiver. Higgins, the co-founder of the Coalition of Independent Childcare Providers of Ontario, runs an unlicensed daycare at her home in south Ottawa. The new law, which takes effect Monday, limits unlicensed home daycare providers to look after a maximum of two children under the age of two, where previously they could care for five children of any age.

    CBC
  • College grad puts her diploma on eBay for $50,000

    One frustrated Florida State University (FSU) graduate turned to eBay for help. Stephanie Ritter, who attended the university from 2007-2011, listed her Bachelor of Arts in Theater diploma on eBay for $50,000. In addition to offering the actual piece of paper in “mint condition,” Ritter offered the buyer a full Florida State experience, including a tour of the university and access to her college memories through Facebook.

    Daily Buzz
  • Wrongfully convicted B.C. man seeks damages after 27 years behind bars

    The wrongful conviction of a British Columbia man who spent nearly three decades behind bars hinged on a flawed police investigation and Crown prosecutors who were willing to go to extremes to prove they'd found their man, a court has heard. Ivan Henry's lawyer John Laxton was in B.C. Supreme Court on Monday to argue that his client deserves compensation after he was mistakenly convicted in 1983 of 10 counts of sexual assault and spent 27 years in prison. "The consequences to Mr. Henry and his family have been devastating and the honour and integrity of the judicial system have been seriously harmed," Laxton told the court.

    The Canadian Press
  • Rob Kardashian Posts Selfie

    Rob Kardashian is back in the selfie game.

    Access Hollywood
  • Man convicted of mischief after taking hidden camera video of sunbathers

    Fri, Aug 28: What police say you should do if someone is secretly taking pictures of you.

    Global News
  • Stephen Harper seen as better than Rachel Notley for Alberta, poll suggests

    Most Albertans believe Stephen Harper is a better defender of Alberta's interests than Premier Rachel Notley, according to a new poll, amid increasing pessimism about the province's economy. Fifty per cent of Albertans give the nod to the federal Conservative leader on that question, compared to 33 per cent who favour Notley, the leader of Alberta's New Democrats, according to a poll conducted by Mainstreet Research. "Recent economic factors, primarily a continued slide in oil prices, are likely a factor in the increased disapproval," said Quito Maggi, president of Mainstreet Research.

    CBC
  • Here's the salary you have to earn to buy a home in 17 major US cities

    Mortgage website HSH.com has updated its estimate of how much annual income a household would need to buy a home in major metropolitan areas in the US, according to second-quarter 2015 data. The site looked at median home prices from the National Association of Realtors, along with interest rates for common 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages and property taxes and insurance costs, to figure out how much money it would take to pay a median-priced home's mortgage, taxes, and insurance in each city — and how much you would have to earn to afford it.

    Business Insider q
  • Calgary Islamic School parents, Muslim Council of Calgary lock horns

    Approximately 30 parents with children at the Calgary Islamic School (CIS) rallied to protest against the leadership of the Muslim Council of Calgary (MCC) after Friday prayers at the Akram Jomaa mosque in Calgary's northeast. The protests started after CIS joined the Palliser Regional Schools in late July — a southern Alberta school board that runs faith-based schools in rural areas and Calgary.

    CBC
  • Mike Corey abandons 30-day solitary wilderness trek after 7 days

    A New Brunswick man who planned to spend a month living alone in the wilderness has abandoned his adventure after seven days. Corey, an intrepid woodsman, who has spent much of the past decade travelling the planet as a video-blogger for high profile clients, such as Microsoft, Skype and the German National Tourism Board, had planned the excursion to mark his 30th birthday.

    CBC
  • What This Couple Found In A Hidden Safe Is The Stuff Of Dreams

    An amazed couple were thrilled to find hidden treasure when they opened a 50-year-old safe.

    Yahoo News
  • Stamkos talks loom; Penguins sale slow; Cooke wants a contract (Puck Headlines)

    Here are your Puck Headlines: A glorious collection of news and views collected from the greatest blogosphere in sports and the few, the proud, the mainstream hockey media. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at puckdaddyblog@yahoo.com.

    Puck Daddy
  • London, Ont., was world's 'serial killer capital': UWO prof

    Only 192 kilometres southwest of Toronto, the city became the "serial killer capital of the world" from 1959 to 1984, according to Michael Arntfield, a criminology professor at the University of Western Ontario. In his new book, Murder City: The Untold Story of Canada's Serial Killer Capital, Arntfield reveals the dark history of the Forest City. Arntfield, who also served as a London police officer for 15 years, analyzed 32 homicides, all the victims being women and children, over a 15-year period.  Some of those cases were solved, but most of the remaining homicides were likely the work of serial killers, the author contends.

    CBC