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  • HuffPost

    Anderson Cooper Delivers Scathing Review Of Rare Stephanie Grisham Interview

    "Does everyone working for the president have to debase themselves and lie like he does?" asked the CNN host.

  • AOL.com

    J.Lo gushes over Kourtney Kardashian's topless photo

    Jennifer Lopez took to Instagram Story to share a photo of her friend Kourtney Kardashian's latest sexy snap.

  • Jenna Dewan felt 'blindsided' by Channing Tatum and Jessie J's relationship

    The 'Step Up' stars were together for almost nine years.

  • Chris Pratt Pokes Fun at Wife Katherine Schwarzenegger's Cooking Skills: 'Did It Go Well? No'

    Schwarzenegger also joked that it's all part of her 'plan' to make Pratt do all the cooking.

  • Adele and Kris Jenner Joined Jennifer Lawrence at Her Rehearsal Dinner

    The wedding will be a star-studded affair.

  • 38 people cited for violations in Clinton email probe

    WASHINGTON - The State Department has completed its internal investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's use of private email and found violations by 38 people, some of whom may face disciplinary action.The investigation, launched more than three years ago, determined that those 38 people were "culpable" in 91 cases of sending classified information that ended up in Clinton's personal email, according to a letter sent to Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley this week and released Friday. The 38 are current and former State Department officials but were not identified.Although the report identified violations, it said investigators had found "no persuasive evidence of systemic, deliberate mishandling of classified information." However, it also made clear that Clinton's use of the private email had increased the vulnerability of classified information.Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill said in a tweet Saturday: "For the umpteenth time the email story is put to bed w/ a clear recognition it was a pointless crusade that took away from so many other issues we should have been discussing in '16."The investigation covered 33,000 emails that Clinton turned over for review after her use of the private email account became public. The department said it found a total of 588 violations involving information then or now deemed to be classified but could not assign fault in 497 cases.For current and former officials, culpability means the violations will be noted in their files and will be considered when they apply for or go to renew security clearances. For current officials, there could also be some kind of disciplinary action. But it was not immediately clear what that would be.The report concluded "that the use of a private email system to conduct official business added an increased degree of risk of compromise as a private system lacks the network monitoring and intrusion detection capabilities of State Department networks."The department began the review in 2016 after declaring 22 emails from Clinton's private server to be "top secret." Clinton was then running for president against Donald Trump, and Trump made the server a major focus of his campaign.Then-FBI Director James Comey held a news conference that year in which he criticized Clinton as "extremely careless" in her use of the private email server as secretary of state but said the FBI would not recommend charges.The Justice Department's inspector general said FBI specialists did not find evidence that the server had been hacked, with one forensics agent saying he felt "fairly confident that there wasn't an intrusion."Grassley started investigating Clinton's email server in 2017, when he was chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. The Iowa Republican has been critical of Clinton's handling of classified information and urged administrative sanctions.Matthew Lee And Mary Clare Jalonick, The Associated Press

  • Thunberg faces counter-rally by workers in Canada's oil heartland

    Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg's planned march in Canada's energy heartland of Alberta will face a counter-rally by a convoy of oil and gas workers on Friday. The truck convoy organized by pro-oil group United We Roll left the city of Red Deer on Friday morning, bound for Edmonton where the organizers plan to protest against outside interference. Swedish activist Thunberg, who has mobilized a global youth movement against climate change, faces a difficult audience in Alberta where the energy sector provides 150,000 direct jobs and contributes more than C$71 billion ($54.1 billion) annually to Canada's gross domestic product.