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  • Mission: Impossible 2 star Thandie Newton says she was "never asked" back after 'surreal' Tom Cruise experience

    'It just pushed me into a place of terror and insecurity.'

  • U.S., Mexican presidents meet at White House to talk USMCA, without Canada

    WASHINGTON - Donald Trump promised an absent Prime Minister Justin Trudeau some in-person presidential face time Wednesday as the U.S. commander-in-chief and his Mexican counterpart went ahead celebrating North America's new trade deal without Canada.Trudeau last week declined to join Trump and Mexico's President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador at the White House, citing the challenges of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and this week's pressing parliamentary business - not to mention the looming threat of renewed U.S. tariffs against Canadian aluminum exports.Trump offered no hint of any such tensions before he and Lopez Obrador signed a joint declaration of solidarity during an outdoor Rose Garden ceremony under a sweltering summer sun.Instead, "we'll have a separate day with Canada - they're coming down at the appropriate time," the president said, declaring the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA, the "largest, fairest and most advanced" trade deal ever signed, and deriding its NAFTA predecessor as precisely the opposite."We want to thank Canada also; I spoke with and will be speaking to the prime minister in a little while," Trump said. "We want to congratulate Canada, and the people of Canada, and the prime minister."Earlier Wednesday, Trudeau extended congratulations of his own, calling the agreement a win for all three countries at a time of serious economic uncertainty."I think it's really important that at a time of economic strain and stress that we continue to have access to the world's most important market. This is good for Canadian workers and Canadian jobs right across the country."The formal debut of the agreement, which took effect last week, has nonetheless been sullied by the U.S. trade representative's claim that Canada has exceeded limits on aluminum exports to the United States established when Trump lifted national-security tariffs on Canadian-made steel and aluminum in May 2019.Trump made no mention of the latest dispute in his Rose Garden remarks, and neither leader took questions. Trudeau, however, said the threat of renewed tariffs "is a little bit difficult to understand," given the potential impact of such a move."The U.S. doesn't make nearly enough aluminum to be able to cover its needs, particularly at a time when we want economies to get going again across North America," he said in Ottawa. "What tariffs would do would be to raise prices for manufacturers in the United States and put extra stresses on them at a time when stresses abound."Higher prices may be precisely the goal: the two U.S. producers that are urging the USTR to take action have ties to a Swiss metals company that holds the exclusive rights to sell Russian-made aluminum in the United States. China, Russia, India and Canada are the four largest aluminum producers in the world.Lopez Obrador's visit to Washington, his first foreign trip since being elected in 2018, has prompted widespread criticism at home for a leader whose campaign trafficked heavily in criticizing Trump. Since then, the leader known in Mexico as AMLO has been pilloried for his deference to a U.S. president famous for aggressive anti-immigration policies at the southern border.With a U.S. presidential election now just four months away, it's Trump who stands to benefit politically from a bilateral visit, experts told a Wilson Center panel discussion Wednesday - and if Lopez Obrador hopes to secure safe harbour from Trump's unpredictable foreign-policy whims, he may be sadly mistaken."If he thinks that going to Washington in this moment ... is going to insulate him or protect him from future actions by this president, especially in a campaign year - against tariffs, against some kind of other punitive measure - I think he's fooling himself," said Roberta Jacobson, a former U.S. ambassador to Mexico under both Trump and his predecessor Barack Obama."Witness the fact that obviously we have the discussion of aluminum tariffs vis-a-vis Canada right now, as we're celebrating USMCA. This is not a president who necessarily says, 'These are my new partners, I will not penalize them no matter what.'"Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer made a similar point, but not without twisting the partisan knife a little."Usually when Justin Trudeau leaves the country, it hurts Canada's position on the world stage, so maybe it's a good thing he stayed home," Scheer said. "He has a perfect losing record when it comes to Donald Trump, so maybe we're better off that he didn't go."New Democrat trade critic Daniel Blaikie, meanwhile, is urging the federal Liberal government to spell out during a House of Commons trade committee meeting Thursday how it plans to protect Canada's aluminum sector from the threat of an "arbitrary attack.""A second tariff levelled at an industry that is already hurting could very well be devastating," Blaikie wrote in a letter this week to International Trade Minister Mary Ng. "The current global pandemic only makes matters worse."This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 8, 2020.- Follow James McCarten on Twitter @CdnPressStyleJames McCarten, The Canadian Press

  • Woman who talked to unconscious husband for 30 years gets solace from B.C. study

    VANCOUVER - For 30 years, Hilary Jordan talked to her husband about the goings on in their family and the world but she wasn't sure if the police officer injured in a crash could hear anything as he lay unconscious in a hospital bed."I like to believe that he did hear me," she said in an interview this week."I said something to him before he passed, which made him know that it was OK to leave us, and I had never said those words before, so shortly thereafter he did pass. I do believe he could hear."Ian Jordan suffered a head injury when he and another officer were on their way to a call in Victoria in September 1987. He died in April 2018.Now, research from the University of British Columbia suggests people who are unresponsive can hear, even hours before they die.Lead author Elizabeth Blundon, who recently graduated from the university with a PhD in psychology, said the findings may bear out a persistent belief among health-care workers that hearing is the last sense to go in the dying process.The study, published recently in Scientific Reports, was the first to investigate hearing when people are close to death, in one case six hours beforehand, Blundon said.The research involved eight patients at a hospice doing a hearing task when they were still responsive. Five of them repeated the task when they became unconscious.A control group of 17 young, healthy participants also took part in the study, which was completed between 2013 and 2017.Participants wore a cap with 64 electrodes that measured brain waves as they listened to a series of tones grouped in five patterns that would occasionally change.Those in the control group pressed a button when they heard the pattern change while the responsive patients at the hospice were asked to count the number of times the pattern changed.The brain activity of the control group and the responsive hospice patients was very similar to that of the unresponsive patients, Blundon said."It's an encouraging sign that at the very least the brain is reacting and processing at some capacity the auditory information that it's receiving," she said of the glimpse into brain activity that persists in the transition between life and death."But I can't tell anybody if their loved one understands them or knows who's talking to them," Blundon said, adding further research is needed to delve deeper into the mysteries of end-of-life hearing.Previous research into hearing of unresponsive patients has been done in Europe on patients with traumatic brain injury and showed they also respond to sound, said Blundon, who hopes to continue her work at the University of Miami, where she may also look into the effects of music on those near death.Dr. Romayne Gallagher, who recently retired as a palliative care physician at St. John Hospice where part of the study was completed, said she noticed during 30 years in her job that patients would react positively when they heard the voice of a loved one, even on the phone.Families can take some measure of comfort from spending time talking to their loved ones, even when they don't respond, she added."A lot of people are scared of this time and they don't quite know what to do and we often say to them, 'Talk to them, play their favourite music.' Things like that."Jordan said she spent thousands of hours "chit-chatting" with her husband and playing his favourite music from the 1970s and '80s on a boom box she brought to hospital."It just seemed natural, speaking to him," she said, adding he seemed to respond most favourably every time she mentioned their son Mark, who was 16 months old when the crash happened.This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 9, 2020.Camille Bains, The Canadian Press

  • Harper's Bazaar

    These Celebrities Don't Use Their Real Names

    Brad Pitt, Rihanna, and Miley Cyrus aren't who you think they are.From Harper's BAZAAR

  • Naya Rivera Missing After 4-Year-Old Son Found Alone in a Boat on California Lake

    On Wednesday, the Glee star, 33, was reported missing after a trip to Lake Piru in Ventura County, California

  • Mom issues somber warning after terrifying encounter with strangers at Goodwill: 'I was hyperventilating'

    Twitter user alyssangelica__, who is a mom of one, took to Twitter to share her frightening ordeal - and how she escaped unscathed. “Omg so so so glad you’re okay!!” one wrote. “It’s seems like terrible men are up to no good at Goodwill trying to take advantage of girls while shopping.”

  • Sharon Osbourne says it's 'embarrassing' for Kanye West to take government loan

    Kanye West has received a loan of several million dollars to avoid laying off Yeezy staff but Sharon Osbourne thinks he should be embarrassed to take it.