• Politics
    The Week

    How 'bewildered' Trump campaign aides would reportedly discreetly escape election challenge meetings

    In the immediate aftermath of President-elect Joe Biden's victory in November, the leaders of President Trump's re-election campaign told him he had about a five to 10 percent chance of picking up enough outstanding votes in Georgia and Arizona and win a legal challenge against election practices in Wisconsin, which would overturn the results, Axios' Jonathan Swan reports in part of his series on the final two months of Trump's presidency.Trump initially told his campaign aides — including campaign manager Bill Stepien, senior adviser Jason Miller, and deputy campaign manager Justin Clark — that it was worth a shot, but he was simultaneously listening to another plan presented by attorneys Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell that was steeped in conspiracy theories.The campaign team's plan might not have much going for it in the long run, but they believed, per Axios, that "a serious search for a path to 270 electoral votes through credible legal challenges" was under way. That illusion was reportedly shattered when Giuliani, Powell, "and a swelling conspiracy crew marched into the room" for a meeting.Things, unsurprisingly, did not go well, and whenever the two groups met, the conversation would begin with the campaign's legal strategies before Giuliani and Powell tok over. Swan reports that "bewildered campaign aides would look around the table at one another, silently asking what the hell was going on" before one person would "invariably shuffle out of the room." Every few minutes, another would follow until they all reconvened safely in Stepien's office down the hall. Read more at Axios.More stories from theweek.com 5 more scathing cartoons about Trump's 2nd impeachment Trump's vaccine delay is getting suspicious The pandemic windfall

  • Politics
    Business Insider

    Kellyanne Conway told Bill Maher that she's 'disappointed' that Trump's accomplishments have been overlooked because of the Capitol riots

    Kellyanne Conway said that the Capitol insurrection "inexcusable" but insisted that the rioters did not represent most Trump supporters.

  • Politics
    USA TODAY

    Fact check: Trump loses several perks only if there's an impeachment conviction by Jan. 20

    Posts get repercussions of a second Trump impeachment mostly correct, but revocation of perks depends on a Senate conviction before Jan. 20.

  • Politics
    Business Insider

    First-term GOP Rep. Peter Meijer says he 'may very well have' ended his political career by voting to impeach Trump

    "I think it's important that we have elected leaders who are not thinking solely about what's in their individual self-interest," Meijer said.

  • Politics
    HuffPost

    'My Pillow Guy' Still Hoping Trump Could Mobilize The Military To Stay In Power

    Devoted Donald Trump supporter My Pillow CEO and TV pitchman Michael Lindellindicated in a manic interview Saturday that he's still hoping the presidentmay use the military to stay in power.

  • Style
    Town & Country

    21 Shirt Dresses to Swing into Spring

    Lengthen that hem, cinch that waist, and lighten up those layers for warmer temps.From Town & Country

  • Politics
    Business Insider

    Rep. Jamie Raskin on Trump impeachment: 'I'm not going to lose my son' in 2020 and 'lose my country' in 2021

    "When we went to count the Electoral College votes, and it came under that ludicrous attack, I felt my son with me," Raskin said of the Capitol riots.